Medicine-less healing

Custom Search 2

Master Peng Xiaoping from China works on Karin Cooke as part of the Medicine-less Healing Program at Kokolulu Farm and Retreats in Hawi. (COURTESY PHOTO BY LEW WHITNEY)
Chantal Guillou-Brennan works on a client. (COURTESY PHOTO BY DIANE ZANDER OF HEARTMOON PHOTOGRAPHY)
Master Peng Xiaoping from China works on Karin Cooke as part of the Medicine-less Healing Program at Kokolulu Farm and Retreats in Hawi. (COURTESY PHOTO BY LEW WHITNEY)
Chantal Guillou-Brennan works on a client. (COURTESY PHOTO BY DIANE ZANDER OF HEARTMOON PHOTOGRAPHY)

As people become more aware of how to care for themselves and loved ones, a wide array of services and modalities of healing open up to them. Hawaii Island, known as the “healing island,” is home to many people who are choosing to live self-sustainable lives, closer to the earth, and who are aware of the many possibilities of healing without medicine.

On our island we have yoga and healing retreats, acupuncture, health spas, lomi lomi massage therapists, nutritional experts, organic fruits and vegetables, the beautiful Pacific Ocean, and sacred sites including Mauna Kea. In North Hawaii, one can find many different practitioners who offer healing touch, energy healing and herbal treatments. Tutu’s House in Waimea is a valuable health resource available to all in the community who want to improve their health and their lives.

There are many types of “energy therapies,” including reiki, therapeutic touch, shamanistic traditions, acupuncture, qi gong or healing touch, which are intended to affect the energy fields surrounding the body. These methodologies are non-toxic, economical, non-invasive and effective. By no means a comprehensive list of the healing methods available, we interviewed five North Hawaii practitioners who offer medicine-less healing for an overview of what “healing” means to them.

Edith Kawai practices healing touch, an “energy therapy” using gentle hand techniques to help re-pattern patients energy fields. Developed as a touch therapy program in the ’80s by a nurse named Janet Mentgen, the system is similar to reiki.

“There is a long list of things that healing touch can help,” Kawai said. “It is complementary with medicine and can help with acute and chronic conditions.”

Kawai said she had always felt she needed to do some sort of healing and became interested in healing touch from a friend. She took the five levels of classes needed to become certified. First she begins with a centering process to calm her mind, access a sense of compassion and become fully present with her patient. Then she focuses on the patient’s highest good and places her hands lightly on the patient’s body or makes sweeping hand motions above the body while the patient lies on a massage table.

“The energy that comes through me is the energy that everyone has,” Kawai said. “It’s been very interesting to learn to sense blockages in the body, and once removed, the body knows what it needs to do to be in balance.”

Healing touch has been known to alleviate pain, reduce stress, help with death and dying, and to increase success with post operative recovery.

At Kokolulu Cancer Retreat in Hawi, a resident qi gong master is on hand to help people. Master Ning, who spent five months at Kokolulu, held qi gong workshops and healing circles, and saw three patients, three times a day every week. By teaching people qi gong, practitioners believe this gives one the ability to have a part in their own healing.

“Your body is very smart,” Ning said. “Most disease is related to negative emotions and through training the mind, a little bit of movement, and with intention and focus, the healing process can begin. Qi gong can help with anything, not just cancer.”

Qi gong is about being in the moment and focusing on the positive, which in turn strengthens the chi of the body. By understanding the cause of the disease, that it may stem from the mind or behavior, then physical and spiritual health can improve.

“The difference between people in China and Hawaii,” Ning explained, “is that in China, their bodies are relaxed but their minds are always busy. In Hawaii, people’s bodies are busy, but their minds are relaxed. You cannot expect to come for one visit and be healed. One has to work (diligently) to get the healing process.”

The Quantum Radiance Coaching Method is what Dr. Angela Longo practices and teaches. Longo’s book, “Relationshifting; Tools for Living Quantum Resplendence,” explains her techniques and how she has combined many of the modalities she has learned over the years to produce a system that assists with healing the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual bodies.

“After being diagnosed with liver cancer, I wanted to restructure myself,” Longo said. “Quantum Radiance Coaching uses easy methods to help people find their beliefs, re-sequence their DNA and to nourish the wholeness of ones particular universal-self.”

Now cancer-free, Longo counsels and teaches people her healing method in many parts of the world. Her background in Traditional Chinese Medicine, (she was founder and professor of TCM College in Waimea), a biochemist researcher at University of California-Berkeley and more than 40 years of clinical experience, has allowed her to create a system she calls the “eight bottom lines,” which she says block the flow of positive energy in our lives. Bathwaves, an acronym for energy patterns based upon beliefs, attitudes, thoughts, habits, words, actions, values and emotions, are used to quickly shift the relationship within one’s self.

Reiki and quantam healing hypnotherapy are just two of the energy therapies practiced and taught by Chantal Guillou-Brennan. She remembers that when she was a child, not only was she “fascinated by the divine,” she also had a natural ability to put her hands on people’s heads and press healing points to make them feel better. By integrating different healing modalities she has learned throughout her years, Guillou-Brennan said she loves the diversity in what she does.

“Each person is different, and there is no ‘one recipe’ for all,” Guillou-Brennan said. “There are many ways to health, and I like to customize healing methods for each person.”

She founded the Integrative Energy Medicine Institute, an “institute without walls,” and teaches classes in Hawaii, the continental U.S. and France. Her treatment sessions may include jin shin jyutsu (acupuncture without needles), the Emotional Freedom Technique, reiki, shamanic techniques or visualization. Guillou-Brennan said IEMI is a holistic and synergistic approach to energy work addressing the body, mind and spirit.

Guillou-Brennan believes integrative energy medicine can maintain good health, remove blocks and unwanted patterns, reduce or manage pain, remove toxins from the body, expand one’s awareness of higher self and bring joy, love and peace to one’s heart. With quantam hypnotherapy, Guillou-Brennan said patients respond quickly and successfully because direction comes from one’s “higher self” and not from the therapist.

“I teach reiki to people because it is one modality that they can do on themselves, as well as help others,” said Guillou-Brennan.

For Kellyna Campbell, of the Kohala Healing Center, the foundation of everything is love. Campbell quit a successful business life to travel the world and embark on a spiritual quest. As an intuitive healer, she has committed her life to the path of healing through study and practice.

“I wrote my first book, ‘The Nine Inner Jewels,’ for daily living,” Campbell said. “These are communing with nature, breathing, self-love, meditation, forgiveness, gratitude, daily exercise, eating mindfully and thinking/speaking/acting in love.”

Campbell’s education in the healing arts has continued to deepen her appreciation for life, and she readily helps those in need. She does energy and space clearing, pet healing, is a licensed minister and holds workshops and healing circles.

“Healing gives me the greatest joy,” said Campbell. “We are the creators of our lives, and the most sustainable thing we can do is love ourselves.”