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Harbor Gallery announces results of their Winter Wood Show

Scott Hare’s sculpted, lidded calabash, hand carved of a single piece of Milo Wood, titled “Day or Night” and depicting the endangered Hawaiian i’o and the Hawaiian pueo earned “Best in Show.” (PHOTO COURTESY OF HARBOR GALLERY)
Scott Hare’s sculpted, lidded calabash, hand carved of a single piece of Milo Wood, titled “Day or Night” and depicting the endangered Hawaiian i’o and the Hawaiian pueo earned “Best in Show.” (PHOTO COURTESY OF HARBOR GALLERY)
Stan Kerr’s calabash bowl earned first place in the sculpture category. (PHOTO COURTESY OF HARBOR GALLERY)
Stan Kerr’s calabash bowl earned first place in the sculpture category. (PHOTO COURTESY OF HARBOR GALLERY)

The 2014 Winter Wood Show at Harbor Gallery has just finished with a flurry of collectors selecting their favorite pieces to cherish and have in their homes, but not before voting for the “Best of Show” and for winners in each of the four categories.

Scott Hare’s piece entitled “Day or Night” was awarded “Best of Show.” The sculpted, lidded calabash, hand carved of a single piece of milo wood, depicts the endangered Hawaiian hawk (i’o) and the Hawaiian owl (pueo). Hare also wins a cash prize of $250 for winning the top award with the most votes overall.

The first place winner in the joinery category is Correy Smith for his “Chadansu” made from koa with drawers made from solid silver oak. Correy also wins a $100 prize for his stunning entry as winner of the category.

The first place winner in the turning category is John Mydock for his “Whale Songs” turned from Norfolk Island pine and intricately decorated with pyrography depicting whales and other sea creatures, inside and out.

The first place winner in the sculpture category is Stan Kerr for his hand carved, giant calabash bowl with pyrograhic designs burned into the outside, made of albizia.

The first place in the open category is Frank Chase for his ingenious contraption titled “Semi Elliptical,” which makes intricate drawings on paper utilizing a pair of pendulums that move in various directions, similar to a harmonograph, but of his own creation. The presentation is stunning in koa and turned, polished brass fittings and weights.

Proceeds from the show benefit the Kohala Watershed Partnership with thousands of dollars for their programs to protect and preserve parts of the environment in Kohala. Several pieces are still in the gallery for viewing or purchase. Harbor Gallery is located in Kawaihae Harbor next to Café Pesto and Kohala Divers, and is open daily 11:30 until 8:30. For more information, visit www.harborgallery.biz or call 882-1510.